Official Supporter of TEAM ABN AMRO in the Volvo Ocean Race

TEAM ABN AMRO | VOLVO OCEAN RACE | Leg 9 | Rotterdam - Gothenburg

TEAM ABN AMRO ONE OFFICIAL WINNER VOLVO OCEAN RACE 2005-2006

TEAM ABN AMRO
© TEAM ABN AMRO | Jon Nash - www.abnamro.com/team

Sidney Gavignet: It’s all over!

Log 50 - 20 June 2006
Back home after an adventure that lasted a year and a half. I use the word adventure because despite all the professional and serious aspects, you cannot separate the Volvo Ocean Race from certain notions: it is a premier, high class competition, an ocean adventure and a human endeavour.

Looking back over this around the world race, I recall some of the most powerful moments:

  • First night of the first leg: brutal winds of 30-35 knots freeze us to the bone! Our code zero is in pieces, the helm and pedestal are ripped off leaving a gaping hole in the deck, cracked ribs and a damaged knee: that’s about the summary of these difficult beginnings.
  • Cape Town in-port race: 35 knots, choppy seas, Table Mountain and blue skies; our adversaries are laid out on the water and fight to control their stability while ABN AMRO ONE crosses the line with an impressive lead; it was the first big psychological blow.
  • Approach to Cape Horn: 40 knots, the sea is savage and the waves are powerful. The force of the water that crashes onto the deck is violent. Truly a Cape Horn experience!
  • The sprint from Annapolis to New York: an exhausting day and night, many sail changes and maneuvers in big seas. The arrival was one of the most tiring of the race.
  • The loss of Hans: I was preparing to go up on deck and ask Moose if we have any good news from the search: “Hans is dead”
  • Rotterdam in-port race: we won in difficult conditions in a tight race, it was a respost from the crew to those who thought that our victory in the overall standings was mainly thanks to the boat.

Exceptional People
Mike Sanderson (Moose) has led this campaign with intelligence and strength, stamped with his personality. Stan Honey, quiet but very important to the success on the water, is not only the most impressive navigator I have ever encountered but a lovely person. All the other members of the crew each have their own individual personality, each very different from the other, the magic meant that everything worked out for the best. We started out as 10 and finished a year later as the same… sign of a super crew.

Overall it feels like a beautiful result, a long and difficult year and mission accomplished.

I certainly enjoy going home… But already in my head: “and next”?

To all, those who have followed this race via my little diaries, a big thank you!

Take care,

Sidney Gavignet

TEAM ABN AMRO

© TEAM ABN AMRO | Jon Nash - www.abnamro.com/team


A massive win for TEAM ABN AMRO

17 June 2006
In a spectacularly tight finish, ABN AMRO TWO squeaked across the finish line in second place, completing their promise before the race to beat out sister boat ABN AMRO ONE on at least one leg this race. The young crew, after a particularly rough last few legs, finally had the victory they had so long sought. There was a lot of back-slapping on board as they crossed the line. They now have 59.5 total points, and finished fourth overall.

The overall race winner, however, was ABN AMRO ONE, with 96 total points. Despite a poor finish this leg, in which they had a fairing shear off their keel, they had earned more than 20 points over their nearest competitor Pirates of the Caribbean,with 73 points.

ABN AMRO TWO also retained the world monohull speed record, 563 nautical miles in 24 hours on 11 January. Neither their sister boat ABN AMRO ONE nor the competition were able to beat this from Leg 2. In the early legs of the race, they packed a one-two punch, winning a podium finish leg after leg.

The finish to the Volvo Ocean Race 2005-2006 had everyone on the edge of their seats for hours before the finish. For much of this leg, which started out in Rotterdam, ABN AMRO TWO enjoyed a comfortable lead over her competitors. The conditions were better for most of the leg than the fleet expected, and more favourable to the boat’s design. This lead dwindled, however, in the final hours as the wind died. At one point they had an over 20 mile lead, which dwindled to just metres by the end.

Thousands of spectator boats turned out to watch this spectacle, with nearly every local boat on the water. This also created a lot of wake in the way of the fleet, which they were not always pleased about, but added to the overall challenge.

This finish was even more exciting than that of the Wellington finish, in which ABN AMRO ONE lost out to movistar by a mere nine seconds. This battle was of the underdog ABN AMRO TWO, whom no one had expected to do so well in relatively light airs compared to the slimmer Farr boats.

ABN AMRO ONE though chose a route closer to the coast, which did not pay off for them. They also had a fairing problem with their keel which meant they had to sail much more slowly. They trailed the fleet for most of this leg. Yet overall they were the race winner, winning five of the seven in-port races and seven of the nine offshore legs. After Leg 7 they had already won the race based on overall points.

ABN AMRO TWO’s result this leg was all the more satisfying given that the crew also experienced the most traumatic race of any crew, having lost fellow sailor Hans Horrevoets on the way from New York to Portsmouth. Then they had to rescue the sailors of movistar when their boat went under. They went from second in the overall race leaderboard after Leg 1, to their current fifth place. Yet their overall achievements were incredible given the general lack of offshore experience onboard and the obstacles the crew had to overcome given their relatively short time sailing together before the race started.

© TEAM ABN AMRO | www.abnamro.com/team


A race future to look forward to

17 June 2006
At long last, sailors and the public alike got the answer they had long been awaiting: Volvo Ocean Race organiser Glenn Bourke announced that there would be a 2008-2009 edition of the Volvo Ocean Race. This edition would only be about 2.5 years after this edition, 1.5 years ahead of the normal race life cycle. He also confirmed that the Volvo 70 will be used again in this race with some slight modifications, and that two as-yet-unnamed sponsors are already on board. In-port racing will continue to be a major part of the race.

And, particularly important for potential sponsors, the race could potentially sail to the Middle East, Asia, India and/or the western coast of the United States.

TEAM ABN AMRO Campaign CEO Jan Berent Heukensfeldt Jansen also announced this morning that "we would like to keep the boats racing till 1 January 2008. We will announce our plans for that next week at our Homecoming Party in the Netherlands on 22 June."

A reaction from the sailing team
Shore director Roy Heiner called the announcement “excellent, that’s what we’ve been waiting for for a long time.” As the brain behind the TEAM two-boat concept, Heiner has been involved with this race from the very beginning.

“I am very grateful to Volvo for announcing that now. That means there is a future for ocean racing. I will be involved in the next Volvo Ocean Race, it’s a very unique race. It is really the premium of offshore racing. I think it’s very important to combine East-West and North-South. I think the oceans are big enough to provide the most amazing race course. I am sure the Southern Ocean will also be included. I think it is very good to look at new markets.”

"It was ABN AMRO, which decided in October 2003 to participate in this race. ABN AMRO found it to be an excellent platform for marketing and communications, but also to get 100,000 employees excited about the race and communicating that to their clients. For us it was a tragic accident with the loss of Hans Horrevoets. When we started this race we knew this was a risky venture. We said at the beginning we wanted to share the values of the bank to the world: professionalism, teamwork and respect. The success of the campaign took on a very dark tinge. If you look at the success of the sailing team and the success of the marketing team has been a success. We think we will get to the targets we set before the campaign in terms of media value."

Bourke said that this announcement “was the last opportunity to get it out, we had the momentum here. It has been a big push. You should have seen the joy, the smiles everywhere. It has come to me now, that so many people were hanging onto this decision, just as I was.”

Bourke had some special words for the younger sailors in the race, such as crew TWO. “For these guys, particularly the young up-and-comers, they are just getting their teeth into this game. The fact they only have to wait three years will inspire them to keep sailing.”

Official Supporter of TEAM ABN AMROBourke says this new format brings all new challenges to an already challenging race, but says they will pay off in the end, just as the new boat design ultimately paid off in this race. “The corporates tell us it was a good decision, we are in.”

With the potential course changes, the race could attract a whole new group of fans. “The Asia component means a lot of work, and we are going to do surveys to advise us. We need to start negotiating with the ports. We are also looking at the teams in the race, how can we help make this commercially more viable for everybody. I’ve had highs and lows and the breakdowns have always concerned me. But today I can say, ‘yeah, this is right’ (to sail the Volvo 70), and I hear it from the sailors. You know it is the right tool for this race.”

Bourke said he is exploring the Beijing Olympics as a potential venue. He said he has thought about female teams with up to 13 women on board. He also claimed that 1.6 billion viewers have watched the TV programming and 25,000 articles have been written thus far.

© TEAM ABN AMRO | www.abnamro.com/team



A fitting finish James Boyd of the Daily Sail

17 June 2006
Choosing a favourable easterly track as they sailed up the west coast of Denmark, yesterday allowed ABN AMRO TWO to leave the other Volvo 70s in her wake and pull out a 15 mile lead. Unfortunately after rounding the top of Denmark last night and en route to the Gothenburg finish line, so the wind disappeared leaving the white boat wallowing helplessly under the Scandinavian sun surrounded by an armada of spectator craft.

“We couldn’t have been any more unlucky or someone has got very very bad karma on board,” fumed navigator Simon Fisher after their arrival. “We sat there with no wind and watched Pirates pop over the horizon and get closer and closer and closer. They sailed right up over the top of us so that they could gybe and cross and then we finally got the breeze and off we went.”

ABN AMRO TWO were overtaken late this morning, as 1997-8 race winner Paul Cayard used the white boat’s static position to spot where the windless area was on the course was enabling him simply to sail around it. “Sometimes it is bad to be in the front of the fleet because those behind can see where the light spots are,” commented skipper Sebastien Josse.

The white boat’s moment of glory stolen, the crew made a valiant effort to regain the lead and the two boats had a fantastic gybing duel where crew error on either boat could have altered the outcome within sight of the line. ABN AMRO TWO came close to passing the Pirates as they rounded the final light house on the course but Paul Cayard, one of the world ‘s most experienced helmsman, simply closed the door on them. They eventually crossed the line 4 minutes 50 seconds after the Pirates.

For the crews arriving in Gothenburg marks the end of the 2005-6 Volvo Ocean Race, a seven month long race, many having spent at least 18 months of their lives solely involved with their campaigns. “It certainly is a bit of weight off your shoulders, because especially in my position as boat captain, always worrying about what has to be done for the next leg,” said Nick Bice who has been involved in the ABN AMRO TWO crew longer than anyone having been part of the boat’s original build team. “Fortunately during the race we had such good shore crew and everything was really done well and the boat was proven and we were very successful in that it got around the race course, so we are very happy about that.”

For Josse the arrival in Gothenburg, to a dock jam packed with spectators, press and well-wishers, the race did not feel like it was over. “Now the race is over but all the crew are here and all the team, so it is not really over. Maybe I will only realise when I go home.” Josse’s arrival in Gothenberg now allows him to say he has sailed around world fully crewd on board a big multihull, singlehanded in the Vendee Globe (which he wishes to compete in again) and now fully crewed on a monohull.
For ABN AMRO ONE this leg was not their best, finishing in last place some five miles behind fifth placed Ericsson. “We broke a bit off our keel on day one and so we decided to do something a bit extreme: we hit a corner and the corner wasn’t the right corner,” said skipper Mike Sanderson after they’d tied up along a dock still deeply lined with spectators.

But Sanderson was anything but despondent. “What do you mean not a great result? We won the Volvo Ocean Race! Our biggest aim for this leg was to be here the same day as everyone else! This was a bit of a slow bus to get to the party! And we got in here in the afternoon in the sun and for all our supporters who have given us such a fantastic trip around the world. There has been nothing wrong with today. This is the home of the Volvo Ocean Race so it is good to be here.”


The end is nigh
While this race represents Sanderson’s second win having competed in three races now, for watch captain Mark Christensen it is a case of three wins out of three, having previously sailed on board EF Language and illbruck Challenge, winners of the last two races. “It hasn’t sunk in yet,” said Christensen. “We’ve got to enjoy this for a couple of days and then go and spend some time with the family which is something I haven’t done enough of in the last year and a half. You get very selfish when you do these sort of projects so it is probably time to give some time back to them.”

Christensen says if he returns to the Volvo Ocean Race then it will not be as a sailor. “I am not planning on doing another race. I could be involved again, but I wouldn’t sail. I’ve moved on from that. It is hard with the family, when you are offshore going through the Southern Ocean thinking about them and I couldn’t do that again. And I don’t need to.” What he really enjoys is the creation of the boats and decisions made in the build-up. Christensen was instrumental in this role for the ABN AMRO campaign.

Meanwhile Sanderson says the chances of him returning for this fourth stab at the roud the world race are very good.

British ABN AMRO ONE crewman Rob Greenhalgh acknowledged that the last two legs had been painful in the ultra-light conditions. “We were becalmed on this leg for god knows how long. I guess everyone has had their eye off the ball a bit really. We didn’t have to be there and it does change you mental attitude a little bit.”

Compared to the old hands, this is Greenhalgh’s first Volvo Ocean Race and it has been a great privilege to have got to race on the winning boat. “This is my first really big boat offshore thing and it’s been fantastic. I’m lucky enough to have been with a great team and a great bunch of sailors. I’m very lucky,” he commented, clothes still dripping after the entire crew had been thrown in the water, as is the tradition for winners of yacht races.

To say there will be partying and celebration for Team ABN AMRO tonight would be an understatement. This will be followed by the official Volvo prize giving dinner tomorrow before the boats return to Holland and major homecoming celebration in Rotterdam planned for Thursday night.

This will be a final thank you for a campaign, originally the brain child of leading Dutch sailor Roy Heiner, sailed by Mike Sanderson, Seb Josse and their teams and managed by Jan Berent Heukensfeldt Jansen and his team.

“For me this has been my life since December 2004 - two and a half years,” commented Heukensfeldt Jansen. “It is a long time. It has been down to preparation and team work and this is such a good team. They had some tough times but they recovered and won the races. I am very proud, but not only of the sailing team - the shore team did an amazing job to work day and night. And if you see where we are now it is a pity is it finished. Everyone is proud and we are proud to be part of the Volvo Ocean Race community.”

The question is – is the story over? For ABN AMRO ONE and ABN AMRO TWO it is not as they will continue to compete in sailing events in the US and Europe over the course of the next 18 months. As for the next Volvo Ocean Race Heukensfeldt Jansen says: “Who knows? The next race is up to others. If it has a purpose for the bank we’ll do it. If it doesn’t we won’t.”

Sanderson says in this situation he is very relieved they are not having to struggle for overall points. This is not the case for ABN AMRO TWO who have to remain ahead of Ericsson if they to hold fourth place overall in the 2005-6 Volvo Ocean Race. A win for white boat with Ericsson in fifth, as she is at present, would be just what the ABN AMRO TWO crew would like to sign off this race with.

TEAM ABN AMRO

© TEAM ABN AMRO | Jon Nash - www.abnamro.com/team

TEAM ABN AMRO

© TEAM ABN AMRO | Jon Nash - www.abnamro.com/team

TEAM ABN AMRO

© TEAM ABN AMRO | Jon Nash - www.abnamro.com/team


Fur Photography | Fur Group

© Fur Photography | Ferdy Rozenberg - www.furphoto.net

Mike Sanderson: Thank you, Rotterdam!

Log 127 - 16 June 2006, 11:15 UTC
We always knew that the Rotterdam stopover would be big for us. Homeport, in our home country, it was going to be busy. The reality is though, that it far out weighed our expectations. The amount of public support and enthusiasm for the Volvo Ocean Race was huge.

Whenever we went anywhere with the boats, there where hundreds of spectator boats, and there was a constant crowd at the race village which then rose to football stadium numbers for arrivals and departures... Very, very cool. Thank you Rotterdam and the Netherlands for a wonderful time! It was just such a shame that it was not for a bit longer, it all seemed to come and go very quickly.

The stopover went well for us from a race standpoint on ABN AMRO ONE as well. Second for the leg after a record slow trip from Portsmouth, was a result that we were very happy with and maybe the biggest surprise of any of the podium finishes so far in the race. But the most exciting day was the day that we won the in-port race, even though it was the afternoon of the Dutch first game of the soccer World Cup. There where hundreds of boats were out on the water and people lining the shore all the way up and down the 20 mile strip of the river.

Someone must be stressed out there
We led from start to finish in conditions that were well under our optimum. So it was a very satisfying result, and a great treat to give to our home crowd.

This leg hasn't been going so well. We were a little over-anxious to get a good start and were over the line apparently when the gun went, so had to go back, which cost us a few minutes. But then all day yesterday the boat just didn't feel itself. The conditions should have been great for us, normally we are just a bullet in a good 13 to 15 knot beat.

We now know why, though. Since its final inspection in the water, we must have picked up or hit something in the water. This has knocked off the fairing between the steel and the carbon part of our keel, it's not structural. We have no risk of it causing any more damage, but it is for sure slowing us down. What a huge relief that we don't need a result in this leg to still win overall, with the conditions so flukey and going against the forecast there must be some stressed people out here.

Clipped wings
ABN AMRO TWO is currently leading Ericsson. So if they finish there then "The Kids" will maintain their fourth spot and even more dramatic is that the Brasil 1 is first and the Pirates are fifth!!. If they were to finish like this I believe that Brasil 1 would take second spot off the Pirates.

So for us now with our wounds, it is all about getting to Sweden as quickly as possible so we can celebrate with as many of you as possible the winning of this version of the Volvo Ocean Race. Don't get me wrong, we will do everything we can to get there first as well, but that ask I am guessing is probably a little too big since we have literally got one of our wings clipped.

I will write again tomorrow to say some goodbye's, but for now it's back to staring at the B&G Instruments to see if I can convince the wind to shift left so that our side of the course pays...

Talk soon.

Cheers,

Mike Sanderson

© TEAM ABN AMRO | www.abnamro.com/team


TEAM ABN AMRO

© TEAM ABN AMRO | Jon Nash - www.abnamro.com/team

Si Fi: Time to reflect

Log 115 - 17 June 2006, 08:01 UTC
Hi There,

In the final stages of this race we are once more left drifting around in little if no wind. It is a nervous time here on ABN AMRO TWO as we ghost through the water at the head of the fleet. We are all praying that we have enough breeze to carry us over the finish. Simeon (Tienpont) is up the rig looking for breeze, in fact for the first time in this race despite being a bowman. At 105 kilos it is no mean feat hauling his bulkup the thirty metre mast!!

The last 24 hours have been good to us, each sched being a little more positive than the last, egging the boys onward towards the finish. We have been free from park ups having always had more breeze than the forecast as we sailed around the tip of Denmark. However, trickier times are now upon us. With only 4 knots of wind the going is getting very, very slow.

Despite the calm conditions and the slow pace of the boat there is little time to reflect upon what we have accomplished in the last eight months. That can all come later. There is the odd joke about - this is the last time we will do this or that, knowing tonight it will all be over. But for the time being the race is still very much alive for us here and not nearly over yet. We have yet to secure our position and even get to the line in the dying breeze...

Cheers for now,

Simon Fisher

© TEAM ABN AMRO | www.abnamro.com/team


A race future to look forward to

17 June 2006
At long last, sailors and the public alike got the answer they had long been awaiting: Volvo Ocean Race organiser Glenn Bourke announced that there would be a 2008-2009 edition of the Volvo Ocean Race. This edition would only be about 2.5 years after this edition, 1.5 years ahead of the normal race life cycle. He also confirmed that the Volvo 70 will be used again in this race with some slight modifications, and that two as-yet-unnamed sponsors are already on board. In-port racing will continue to be a major part of the race.

And, particularly important for potential sponsors, the race could potentially sail to the Middle East, Asia, India and/or the western coast of the United States.

TEAM ABN AMRO Campaign CEO Jan Berent Heukensfeldt Jansen also announced this morning that "we would like to keep the boats racing till 1 January 2008. We will announce our plans for that next week at our Homecoming Party in the Netherlands on 22 June."

A reaction from the sailing team
Shore director Roy Heiner called the announcement “excellent, that’s what we’ve been waiting for for a long time.” As the brain behind the TEAM two-boat concept, Heiner has been involved with this race from the very beginning.

“I am very grateful to Volvo for announcing that now. That means there is a future for ocean racing. I will be involved in the next Volvo Ocean Race, it’s a very unique race. It is really the premium of offshore racing. I think it’s very important to combine East-West and North-South. I think the oceans are big enough to provide the most amazing race course. I am sure the Southern Ocean will also be included. I think it is very good to look at new markets.”

"It was ABN AMRO, which decided in October 2003 to participate in this race. ABN AMRO found it to be an excellent platform for marketing and communications, but also to get 100,000 employees excited about the race and communicating that to their clients. For us it was a tragic accident with the loss of Hans Horrevoets. When we started this race we knew this was a risky venture. We said at the beginning we wanted to share the values of the bank to the world: professionalism, teamwork and respect. The success of the campaign took on a very dark tinge. If you look at the success of the sailing team and the success of the marketing team has been a success. We think we will get to the targets we set before the campaign in terms of media value."

Bourke said that this announcement “was the last opportunity to get it out, we had the momentum here. It has been a big push. You should have seen the joy, the smiles everywhere. It has come to me now, that so many people were hanging onto this decision, just as I was.”

Bourke had some special words for the younger sailors in the race, such as crew TWO. “For these guys, particularly the young up-and-comers, they are just getting their teeth into this game. The fact they only have to wait three years will inspire them to keep sailing.”

Bourke says this new format brings all new challenges to an already challenging race, but says they will pay off in the end, just as the new boat design ultimately paid off in this race. “The corporates tell us it was a good decision, we are in.”

With the potential course changes, the race could attract a whole new group of fans. “The Asia component means a lot of work, and we are going to do surveys to advise us. We need to start negotiating with the ports. We are also looking at the teams in the race, how can we help make this commercially more viable for everybody. I’ve had highs and lows and the breakdowns have always concerned me. But today I can say, ‘yeah, this is right’ (to sail the Volvo 70), and I hear it from the sailors. You know it is the right tool for this race.”

Bourke said he is exploring the Beijing Olympics as a potential venue. He said he has thought about female teams with up to 13 women on board. He also claimed that 1.6 billion viewers have watched the TV programming and 25,000 articles have been written thus far.

© TEAM ABN AMRO | www.abnamro.com/team


Tables completely turned James Boyd of the Daily Sail

16 June 2006
Following ABN AMRO ONE’s win and the last position of ABN AMRO TWO on leg eight into Rotterdam, so a day into the final sprint of the Volvo Ocean Race up to Gothenburg, the tables have turned completely.

The two ABN AMRO teams have been applying opposite tactics as they head north to round the top of Denmark. The crew on the black boat has chosen the offshore course, way out to the west, while Seb Josse on ABN AMRO TWO has chosen a route furthest east. The latest position update shows that the latter is paying handsomely as ABN AMRO TWO has pulled out a useful little lead from Brasil 1, while ABN AMRO ONE is holding last place.

“We are the most inside boat, and the wind is just filling in from the southeast, so there is a good chance we might be doing alright,” said a quietly optimistic Simon Fisher on ABN AMRO TWO, the white boat sailing in thick fog at the time of our conversation. “We’ll keep our fingers crossed and wait and see I think.” The advantages of being in ABN AMRO TWO’s position are also that the wind looks set to fill in from their side of the course, while they are also sailing the shortest course to round the top of Denmark.

The forecast information coming through to the boats on this occasion hasn’t tallied with the conditions the boats have seen. From the wind blowing from the north yesterday so today it has veered southwest. Fisher reckons that the low pressure system that was sitting over Germany and Denmark has shifted west out towards the race course and they have skirted it western side.
Having spent more than a week clawing their way around the British Isles on the last leg, so conditions are once again very light. “We’ve got about 8-9 knots at the top of the mast, but there is more like 4-5 at the deck,” said Fisher. “So it has all been quite light, but we haven’t parked yet.”

The teams have been getting a lot of practice sailing in these conditions. On ABN AMRO TWO they have once again taken all extra off the boat, have taken less sails and have even put on some of their light weather sails they normally use in the in port racing. What they have made sure they won’t run out of this leg is food. “Unlike the last leg we have lots of sweets and chocolate and not too much freezed dried. We are eating like kings!” says Fisher.

The mood is less buoyant on ABN AMRO ONE where Mike Sanderson realises they have made the wrong call with the weather. At the time of our conversation they were making the best they could in 5-6.5 knots of wind. “We believed that the breeze was going to be better in the west so we’ve banked on the west the whole time, but I don’t think it has paid,” said Mike Sanderson. “The guys are digging out of the east no problem at all and it obviously cost us miles to get here. We haven’t had any pay back for it, so that it is making it a little tough.”

To add to their problems the black boat has broken a part of the carbon fibre fairing off the back of her keel fin, the same breakage they suffered during the in port racing in Brazil. “The boat hasn’t felt 100% this whole leg,” continues Sanderson. “Yesterday in some breeze it wasn’t its normal spritely self and I did wonder what was up because Brasil even had a little edge on us in 15 knots. And through the night it still didn’t feel right and at daybreak this morning we found that a good chunk of the keel on the port side is not the colour it is supposed to be.” While this might have no affect on their performance in more wind, in the current light conditions the boat is feeling sticky.

Sanderson says in this situation he is very relieved they are not having to struggle for overall points. This is not the case for ABN AMRO TWO who have to remain ahead of Ericsson if they to hold fourth place overall in the 2005-6 Volvo Ocean Race. A win for white boat with Ericsson in fifth, as she is at present, would be just what the ABN AMRO TWO crew would like to sign off this race with.

“It was a great one for us today,” enthused Sanderson on his return. “We had a ball. The guys did an awesome job getting the boat around the course and keeping us in breeze. In conditions we had today we had no advantage. This was our most satisfying in-port race by miles.”

Once again ABN AMRO TWO fared less well. After a good start they were fifth to the weather mark with the late starter Ericsson behind them. But on the first run they started to make in roads when they were the first gybe off to the left side of the course. Unfortunately after rounding the leeward mark for the first time they had a problem with a headsail and were forced to drop it. Losing time in the process they were passed by Ericsson and were never able to get back into the race. “It is probably a one in a 1000 chance of it happening, but it happened to us today,” said navigator Simon Fisher of the technical problem that occurred.

Following this in-port race ABN AMRO ONE have launched themselves up the points table further still to 94 points, to second placed Pirates of the Caribbean on 66. However ABN AMRO TWO are now just hanging on to fourth place with 52.5 while Ericsson is on 52. This place will be decided on the final leg of the race starting this Thursday into Gothenberg.

© TEAM ABN AMRO | www.abnamro.com/team

Fur Photography | Fur Group

© Fur Photography | Ferdy Rozenberg - www.furphoto.net

Fur Photography | Fur Group

© Fur Photography | Ferdy Rozenberg - www.furphoto.net

Kees Stuip Fotografie | Fur Group

© Kees Stuip Fotografie | Fur Group - www.photostuip.nl

Fur Photography | Fur Group

© Fur Photography | Ferdy Rozenberg - www.furphoto.net